The correct way to use “besides”

Today I want to talk about the word “besides” and how it’s often incorrectly used, especially among second language learners. Many second language learners use the word to mean “in addition to that”. The correct way to use it is actually by adding “that” after it.

Here’s an example of the incorrect use:

“Hi Tina, this is Wani. Please go through the list of ingredients and let me know what needs to be bought. Besides, please help to check whether we have enough plates for the party.”

In the above example, Wani is telling Tina to go through the list of ingredients and to help check whether they have enough plates for the party.

The correct way to use “besides” in the sentence is by adding “that” behind it.

Here’s the correct way to use it:

“Hi Tina, this is Wani. Please go through the list of ingredients and let me know what needs to be bought. Besides that, please help to check whether we have enough plates for the party.”

So remember this: when you’re using “besides” to mean “furthermore” or “in addition to”, add “that” after it.

When to use “besides” with a comma after it

You might be wondering, “but I always see people using ‘besides’ with a comma after it. How does that work?”

This is often used to reinforce an argument. It has the same meaning as “anyway”. You use it when you’ve set out some points and you want to introduce your final winning argument.

Examples:

“I don’t want to watch the show again because the tickets are too expensive. Besides, I didn’t really enjoy it.”

“I won’t be joining you guys for dinner tonight. It’s been a long day at work and I just want to be at home. Besides, I’m not even hungry.”

So there you have it. The next time you need to use the word “besides”, just remember this post!  I hope this has been helpful!

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